Health Care and Inflammation

Your Best Health Care: Health Care and Inflammation

Health Care and Inflammation

Do you
ever suffer from joint pain or other maladies caused by inflammation? It’s more
common than you may think. Inflammation is typically defined as
a localized physical condition in which part of the body
becomes reddened, swollen, hot, and often painful, especially as a reaction to
injury or infection.
According to
LiveScience,
inflammation
is a vital part of the body’s immune response. It is the body’s attempt to heal
itself after an injury; defend itself against foreign invaders, such as viruses
and bacteria; and repair damaged tissue. Without inflammation, wounds
would fester and infections could become deadly. 
Inflammation
can also be problematic, though, and it plays a role in some chronic
diseases. Inflammation is often characterized by redness, swelling,
warmth, and sometimes pain and some immobility. Much more detailed information is
located at this website: http://www.livescience.com/52344-inflammation.html
.
In a
delicate balance of give-and-take, inflammation begins when pro-inflammatory
hormones in your body call out for your white blood cells to come and clear out
infection and damaged tissue, according to WomenToWomen. These agents are
matched by equally powerful, closely related anti-inflammatory compounds, which
move in once the threat is neutralized to begin the healing process.
Acute
inflammation that ebbs and flows as needed signifies a well-balanced immune
system. But symptoms of inflammation that don’t recede are telling you that the
“on” switch to your immune system is stuck. It’s poised on high alert — even
when you aren’t in imminent danger. In some cases, what started as a healthy
mechanism, like building scar tissue or swelling, just won’t shut off. More
material about inflammation is available at this website: https://www.womentowomen.com/inflammation/causes-of-inflammation/
.
According
to Prevention Magazine,
scientists refer to the immune response gone rogue as
chronic inflammation and have identified it as a contributor to a wide range of
conditions, including heart disease, asthma, and joint pain. Since studies
started making these links in the early 2000s, the term inflammation has become
somewhat of a buzzword, bandied about by health nuts and doctors alike.
Some physicians consider it such an important predictor
of poor health that they monitor patients’ blood for a marker of inflammation,
called C-reactive protein, as part of a standard workup. This testing is still
uncommon, and it’s somewhat controversial, but more and more doctors are adjusting
to the idea of quantifying how sick is their patient…really. One hundred
million Americans suffer from chronic pain, and they deal with it day after day
with no clear fix. Twenty-one million have depression, and for many of them,
medication and therapy help only so much.
Meanwhile, scientists are still exploring what
inflammation is and how it might be responsible for so many health problems
like depression and depression symptoms. Much more detail on the connection
between inflammation and depression is located at this site: http://www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/
.
Inflammation has become a medical hot topic, according to
Women’s Health Magazine. More and more research shows that chronic inflammation
is involved in heavy-hitting illnesses like the following:
·        
Cancer
·        
Heart disease
·        
Diabetes
·        
Depression
·        
Allergies
It all starts with the immune system, the body’s first
line of defense against any kind of harm. When you’re injured or sick, your
bone marrow dispatches veritable SWAT teams of white blood cells to root out
infection and jump-start the healing process. Sometimes, however, the immune
system gets a faulty distress signal and deploys an unnecessary first-aid
squad. Those misguided white blood cells still mobilize just like they would if
you were actually under the weather, but because there’s no infection for them
to attack, they end up just hanging around, often for a long, long time.
However, the problem is that your body isn’t made to
accommodate this kind of unfocused immune activity, and eventually those white
blood cells can start damaging your internal organs. They can also needlessly
assault other cells the body routinely uses to push off disease, leaving the
door cracked open for illnesses such as cancer. More information on
inflammation is located at this website: http://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/chronic-inflammation
.
For
centuries, scientists have debated whether inflammation is good or bad for you,
according to New Yorker Magazine. Now they believe that it’s both: too little,
and microbes fester and spread in the body, or wounds fail to heal; too much,
and nearby healthy tissue can be degraded or destroyed. The fire of
inflammation must be tightly controlled—turned on at the right moment and, just
as critically, turned off.
Understanding
and controlling inflammation has become a central goal of modern medical
investigation. The internal research arm of the National Institutes of Health
recently designated inflammation a priority, mobilizing several hundred
scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars to better define its role in
health and disease. More detailed material about this topic is available at
this site: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/11/30/inflamed
.
According
to BodyEcology, there are many reasons why you may suffer from inflammation:
·        
Chronic low-grade food allergies or food sensitivities that
may cause a few symptoms.
·        
An imbalance of bacteria and fungi in your
gastrointestinal tract, also known as dysbiosis. This causes your immune system
to overreact to bacteria in your gut and can be without notable symptoms.
·        
Stress! Constant psychological, emotional
or physical stress raises the level of cortisol, creating inflammation.
·        
Environmental toxicity from air, water,
food pollutants and toxic metals like mercury and lead all contribute to
inflammation and have been linked to diseases as varied as endometriosis and
cancer.
·        
Diet and lifestyle: too much fat,
sugar, and protein in your diet, constant dehydration, consumption of too many
sodas or caffeine, inactivity, and lack of sleep can all increase inflammation
in your body.
According to Mercola, the presence of inflammation is what makes
most disease perceptible to an individual. It can and often does occur for
years before it exists at levels sufficient to be apparent or clinically
significant. How long it has been smoldering really determines the degree of
severity of a disease and often the prognosis assuming the inflammation can be
controlled.
Inflammation
is rampant. In fact 1 in 12 women and 1 in 24 men are dealing with full blown
autoimmune mediated inflammation. The number of undiagnosed people is going to
be much higher. People with inflammation in the early phases of autoimmunity
will often claim no dietary involvement. This is an inaccurate assumption
however because the autoimmunity is often triggered by factors not strictly
related to diet and the diet can become a secondary trigger later in the
development of the condition.
Inflammation
can be good for you when it’s controlled. When it is out of control, then your natural
healing process needs help. See your doctor in cases of acute or ongoing
inflammation, and recognize the symptoms of how your personal situation have
developed. Diagnosis and treatment in a timely manner are worth the time and
effort to discover the cause and possible options for your own healthcare when
you suffer from inflammation.

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